Patrick Henry 1775 Speech Summary

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Patrick Henry’s 1775 speech at the second Virginia Convention, commonly referred to as “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!” in reference to a famous quote lifted from the speech itself, masterfully reflects the requirement for revolution the United States of America had during the time period. The speech not only stands as an emblem of the American Revolution, but as a call-to-arms against any tyranny men that would rear its head anywhere in history, whether this long-term outcome was intended or otherwise. The effectiveness Henry displayed in rallying his peers is certainly inspirational, and his capability cannot be understated. This capability can be attributed to many different factors. One being Henry’s conviction. Every word within the…show more content…
Forgive the pretentious imagery, but this passion and affection towards the content of this speech is somehow unexaggerated. Patrick Henry spends no time sparing the audience from his criticisms. He prefaces his speech by recognizing the differences between his own mindset and his listeners, while stating that he will make no effort to censor his opinion in favor of attempting not to offend their sensibilities. “...I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely and without reserve.” This is an apt conditioning to the sarcastic and generally offensive tone Henry uses throughout the rest of the speech, and aims to justify insults to their character. Riskily, he seeks not to appeal to the inflated egos of those in the convention who believe themselves “wise men”, but rather cut them down to size and present them with a much-needed dose of…show more content…
Henry argues that American retaliation towards British rule was desperately required at the time, and that procrastination would only seek to lead towards the enslavement of the American people those in the convention claimed to
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