The Importance Of Respect In The Sculptor's Funeral '

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Although all of these characters were seen as vices, this tragedy brought out the family relationship in all of them protecting each other until the end. To many of us in this world, the definition can vary from person to person. To me I see family as the love that never wavers and that your love for another person would lead you to do almost anything to protect them. Uncle Billy seemed to have no sense of the word family because he stole and left them to die to save himself which leads me to believe that he doesn’t have the ability to love. This may be because he was never loved as a child or just doesn’t understand what family is. For the rest of them who stayed in the woods, Duchess was the mother, she held piney, the daughter in the cabin protecting her until she died in her arms. Mother Shipton was the grandmother, she starved herself to be able to feed everybody else, she looked out for everybody hoping that her sacrifice would give everybody a chance to make it out alive. Tom was the son, he looked up to John Oakurst like a father and he left to…show more content…
Respect in The Sculpters Funeral is working to please others while tearing others down to bring your boss up. The sculptor’s funeral gives us insight into what true respect is. Respect is not given, but earned through your character and the and respect you give others as well. Harvey Merrick shows his character through his work as a sculptor. Jim Laird respects Harvey Merrick, first because of his work ethic and also because Jim laird said that Harvey Merricks’ mother made his life “a living hell” and Harvey was able to go make a life for himself. Instead of working for others and joining the standard job everybody had, Merrick chose something he loved to do and taught others how important it can be. This is where my respect for Harvey Merrick comes from, he sets an example and acts as a role model to follow your dreams and to never let anybody tell you

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