The Kansas Nebraska Act: Bleeding Kansas

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1. The resolve over the Oregon and Texas disputes began with the “joint occupation” treaty in 1818, this allowed Britain and United States to both claim authority in the Northwest. This was the initial resolve amongst settlers from either nation. Because the large amount of settlers coming in to the Northwest in the 1840s. This caused an urgency for the United States government to solidify Americas Regions. This brought Polk to proposing the boundary between the United States and British Canada at the 49th Parallel. This only became accepted after Polk threatened war otherwise called the (“Fifty-Four Forty or Fight) to take the border farther north. Though Texas had received its independence from Mexico in 1836, by the mass of Americans immigrating.…show more content…
The Kansas Nebraska Act also known as “Bleeding Kansas” was Douglas wanting to expand the intercontinental Railroad to expand south through slave states. Beginning in Chicago and splitting the territory of Kansas and Nebraska. This led Kansas to come into the Union on the foundation of population sovereignty, causing thousands of pro and anti-slavery forces to transfer to Kansas. When this happened this caused Kansas to become a battle ground. In the spring of 1855 led to a vote of 1600 legal voters in Kansas to vote for territorial legislature. Missourians then began to flood Kansas, resulting in a pro-slavery majority in the territory legislature, resulting in Kansas becoming a legalized slave state. This outraged the Free states and caused them to elect their own delegates to the constitution convention in Topeka. They tried to petition congress for statehood, and President Pierce denounced the Free State group. Pierce also sights them as traitors, showing he is backing pro slavery territorial legislature. When this happened the pro slavery marshal assembled a large posse to arrest them. When they arrived in Lawrence, Kansas they overturned the town, destroyed many printing presses, and burned down the “Governor’s” house. The violence in Kanas began in 1854 and continued thru 1861. When the attack on Lawrence is answered by John Brown and his four sons and few others on the anti-slavery side strike back. They attack several pro slavery settlers at Pottawatomie and

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