Argumentative Essay: Do Ghosts Exist Or Not?

861 Words4 Pages
Last class, we touched a very interesting yet controversial topic: Whether if ghosts exist or not.
In my opinion, we arrived to really important points that I would like to conclude:
What is a ghost? The definition of ghost is the soul of someone who has already passed away that can be manifested in someway in the "world of the living". Ghosts can appear in various forms, they can appear as ectoplasm, shadows, poltergeists or demons.
Many of us don't actually believe in ghosts, but in energy. Some believe that as the law says "energy is neither created nor destroyed", and based on that physical principle we question to ourselves: where does our energy go to after life?. Thus, most of the paranormal events that take place in daily life might
…show more content…
When Swiss scientists electrically stimulated an epileptic patient’s brain, things turned really spooky. The patient reported a shadow person sitting behind her, copying her every move. This leads us to the knowledge that the energy on the brain has a dpside effect that can make us see delusions.

This phenomena, is closely related to a psychological term: the Fundamental Attribution Error.
The Fundamental Attribution Error states that people tend to overestimate the impact of dispositional influences on others’ behavior and underestimate the impact of situational influences on other behavior's.
In order to better understand this, we must set clear what dispositional and situational influences are. Dispositional influences we refer to enduring characteristics, such as personality traits, attitudes, and intelligence; influences found inside every individual. On the other hand, situational influences refer to external situations that can influence someone to behave in someway.

No one knows for sure why we commit the fundamental attribution error, but one likely culprit is the fact that we’re rarely aware of all of the situational factors impinging on others’ behavior at a given moment. Contrarily, we’re less likely to commit the fundamental attribution error if we’ve been in the same situation ourselves or been encouraged to feel empathic toward those we’re
Open Document