Analysis Of Life In The Iron Mills By Rebecca H. Davis

1312 Words6 Pages

Life in the Iron Mills is a very strong read. It deals with a lot of issues that affect worker’s everyday lives: exploitation, greed, wages, capitalism, fairness, and so on. Life in the Iron Mills was written by Rebecca H. Davis in the mid-19th century. Her writing was very visual, it told the true stories of the workers, they weren’t sugarcoated. It showed how muscles were the main drivers of productivity at the time. In short, Davis wrote Iron Mills to bring awareness about working conditions, especially in the up and running industrial mills. While reading Iron Mills, I saw her goals being accomplished; I witnessed the realities of the mills’ environment, not only that, I also saw and felt how the workers lived, not being content with their …show more content…

“Describing the factory interiors as “satanic” scenery, that Dante, in conceiving his inferno must have had in mind.” (Thomas Anshutz) This quote is very strong, it talks about all the hardships the workers had to deal with. Some historians try to paint a pretty picture of the mills, they try to reshape the happenings inside the factories. Which Davis writings fought against, she fought to bring the real pictures out to the public. Laborem Exercens, by John Paul II was a reading that went hand in hand with the Iron Mills. “Man’s life is built up every day from work, from work it derives its specific dignity, but at the same time work contains the unceasing measure of human toil and suffering, and also of the harm and injustice which penetrate deeply into social life.” (Ioannes Paulus PP. II) Here we see that man wants to work, they want to create something, they want to add value, to themselves, and the product or service they’re creating. When work helps man feel worthy and accomplished, their life is content, as they’re doing something that they like, and they see their worth. Whether it’s by a simple ‘thank …show more content…

The wealthy factory owners didn’t care about their employees, they just wanted to increase their profit. Several examples were provided in the video. From them not wanting to pay a higher wage, to not wanting to shorten the work hours, to not providing an adequate living environment to their employees. From this point of view, the owners were cruel and harsh individuals. But, they weren’t the only ones who took advantage of their workers. Currently, I’ve only been shedding light on direct employers, “Is the person or institution with whom the worker enters directly into a work contract.” (Ioannes Paulus PP. II) But another culprit needs to be brought to light as well, and they are indirect workers, “Includes both persons and institutions of various kinds.” (Ioannes Paulus PP. II) Indirect employers are local, state, or federal governments. These entities were also beating up on the worker. They ignored all the heinous working conditions the laborers were facing. The indirect employers were not concerned of the laborer’s wellbeing, because the direct employers had a lot of power and they would also bribe the officials. This is a recipe for disaster, when, indirect and direct employers, industry, and exploitation aren’t regulated. In this world, money became taint, with evil. Money emphasized power and damage. Employers would pursue wealth, without a care for

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