Economic Differences In The Civil War

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During the antebellum period, the huge differences existed between the North and the South in many ways. To begin with, the economy of the North once was similar to that of the South; however, as the U.S. started to develop economically, the North became more industrialized. With the advent of the new technologies, factories in the North could produce more things than before to supply the strong market demand of the nation. On the contrary, the South still was a farming region where farmers mainly worded on plantations to grow cotton. To make more profits, the wealthy plantation owners in the South started to force slaves to labor on the plantations. As a result, slavery became an important part in the southern industry, which also led to the controversy of the slavery issue. Furthermore, the different economic system between the two camps widened the economic gap between the North and the South. While the former enjoyed more economic development and profits, the latter suffered seriously from economic losses. Another factor led the inevitable war was the social difference between the…show more content…
The differences in culture, economy, social structure and ideology had been existed since the founding of the republic. However, no wars had ever happened until 1860. Certainly, the differences between the North and the South contributed to the Civil War, but they were not the main factors that made the war inevitable. On the contrary, it was that politicians from both sides to make the war inevitable. For example, one of the Republican strategists, Salmon P. Chase, orchestrated all the political strategies to turn slavery issue into a political one. If it were not these politicians’ calculations and maneuvers to achieve their political goals and gains, the inevitable war would have been avoidable. As Michael F. Holt

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