How Did Abigail Adams Impact Society

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Born on November 11, 1744 in Weymouth Massachusetts, Abigail Adams was the second first lady of the United States and made her impact on America through her words, both spoken and written. Abigail was married to second U.S. president, John Adams and mother to sixth U.S. president, John Quincy Adams. Deprived of a formal education as a child because of her gender, Abigail took it upon herself to self educate. She learned French on her own as well as a vast variety of other subjects such as theology, government, and law. This helped her later in life as she became John Adam’s right hand, providing him with advice and input as he developed the new country. Adams was not the typical woman and housewife of her time. Unlike others, she furthered …show more content…

These letters—later published into a book, which was the first by a first lady —showed that she was an advocate of women’s rights and believed in equality. In fact, her almost famous saying went “remember the ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors.” Her writings were the earliest known concerning gender equality. Although what she seemed to be most passionate about was changing the educational discrimination against women, she was also not shy in speaking against slavery and the discrimination taking place at the time. It was even noted that Adams taught an African American boy read, despite the opinions others had her actions. As a woman, her voice was not very loudly heard, but that didn’t stop her. Even after her death in October of 1818, her legacy continued through her countless writings about the issues of …show more content…

At an early age, Dix worked as a teacher and even founded her own school called “Dix Mansion” which was primarily for girls and another which was free of charge so that poor girls would be able to get an education. It was not until 1841 when the conditions of the mentally disabled came to Dix’s attention. In that year, she taught Sunday School at the local women’s jail, East Cambridge and saw how poorly the inmates were being treated. The teacher and social reformer took it upon herself to make a change. She used her voice and writing abilities to appeal to the Massachusetts state legislature and was able to increase the budget for the State Mental Hospital at Worchester all the while fighting to create other asylums throughout the eastern coast. Dix was also active at the federal level as well, pitching ideas to Congress, only to come one person shy of creating twelve million acres of land meant solely for the mentally challenged, blind, and deaf. Of course, this was discouraging, but it didn’t stop Dix from making a change and helping those in need. She traveled to Europe and was able to establish a new hospital with the help of Pope Pius IX, only to come back to America and lend a hand in the Civil War as “Superintendent of Nurses.” The fight for the mentally impaired did not stop though, as she continued to

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