John C Calhoun Thesis Statement

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John C. Calhoun was born on March 18, 1782 in Abbeville district, South Carolina. He was born to a wealthy family that had recently moved from Pennsylvania. He enrolled in a local academy at eighteen years old and attended Yale College two years later. After college, Calhoun spent a year at law school and studied in the office of a member of the Federalist Party. He was elected to the South Carolina state legislature in 1808 and to the United States House of Representatives in 1811. A passionate politician, he advocated for war with Great Britain shortly after the inception of the United States. He was the chairman on the committees that passed bills supporting roads, permanent roads, and a strong army and navy. During this time, he was a proponent…show more content…
He was a leading member of the old Republican party (later the Democratic party). When Calhoun was elected as the vice president in 1824 and again in 1828, he had become a prominent supporter of states' rights. He believed the constitution should be strictly followed, and that the states were sovereign under the constitution. He especially believed that states should have the power to nullify any legislation passed by the federal government. His view was influenced by the tariff under debate in congress and the potential of the outlawing of slavery in the states. Unfortunately for Calhoun, most other people denied his doctrine of nullification. His bold and overconfident nature tended to create distrust between him and his fellow politicians. Besides being elected vice president, Calhoun also possessed a strong desire to be elected to the presidency: he ran in three separate elections. He was so desperate to be elected that he wrote anonymous autobiographies to persuade voters to vote in his favor. Despite these attempts, all he accomplished was the vice…show more content…
He was born to modest wealth on his family's farm. Although his father died when he was four years old, Clay's mother remarried, which allowed Clay to have a comfortable childhood. Despite this, biographies from this period often portray Clay's childhood as being characterized by poverty. He was introduced to jurist George Wythe in his youth, introducing him to law. He received legal instruction from attorney general Robert Brooke. A group of companion lawyers persuaded him to move to Lexington, Kentucky in 1797, where Clay developed a thriving law practice. He became a legal pioneer by developing new legal innovations. In 1799, he married Lucretia Hart, whose wealth allowed Clay to buy a large farm. When speaking, Clay was able to memorize long speeches, which allowed him to gain political prominence. He openly disapproved of slavery in Kentucky and argued against the Alien and Sedition acts of 1798. Clay's sense of national honor allowed him to be elected to the Kentucky legislature for seven terms. He was also chosen to fill two unexpired positions in the U.S. senate. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1811 and became the youngest house speaker in U.S. history. After securing this position and leading the War Hawks faction, he was able to persuade others to declare war on Britain in 1812. He also served on the delegation
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