Juxtaposition In Hamlet

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In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, while guarding the castle, waiting in anticipation of the ghost’s appearance, Hamlet, Horatio and Marcellus hear trumpets flourish from within, proclaiming the King’s late night partying (1.4). Horatio asks about the nature of the commotion, however, Hamlet remains nonplussed, crestfallen by the evening’s affairs. In his lengthy, 26-line response to Horatio’s simple question, “Is it a custom,” Hamlet experiences an internal struggle between fated traditions and logic, elaborates upon the country’s damaged reputation, the immediate yield of the King’s drinking, and argues that even the most picayune evils can eradicate a man’s fame (14). Hamlet, despite his devotion to kin and country, through sardonic diction, repetition, …show more content…

Hamlet uses juxtaposition when he says, “…it is a custom / More honor’d in the breach than the observance,” and ironically discusses the honor he perceives in the discontinuation of the custom rather than the King’s “honoring,” or maintaining of tradition (17-18). As Hamlet continues to elaborate upon the flaws and failures of men, he strategically uses repetition to maintain tone and mature his idea. Throughout his response to Horatio, Hamlet cultivates his argument based on the influence of nature, and uses “nature” four times in 26 lines. Explaining, “Wherein they are not guilty…Being nature’s livery, or fortune’s star,” Hamlet reflects upon the powerlessness of the flawed man as a result of nature’s behavior, and his own subjection to Claudius’ ruling (23, 34). Hamlet is clever when constructing his response because by echoing words and ideas, he maintains the listeners focus, fosters his argument, and creates a unique, and evident, …show more content…

Hamlet integrates metaphors seamlessly, insuring that they are not overpowering, while also provoking the listener to question and consider the arguments he presents. While Hamlet’s dialogue expresses his own opinion, it also aims to inculcate his ideas on the listener, shifting from beginning with “But to my mind,” to decisively stating From that particular fault: the dram of

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