Mount Tambora Research Paper

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Volcano’s

Have you ever wondered how deadly a volcano is? They can be one of the deadliest natural disasters ever because of the harsh winds. They are formed from tectonic plates and there are 3 different types. Mt.Tambora is one of the worst ever. Volcanoes are formed as mountains that can be deadly. The tornado-like winds and ash from the eruption, opposed to the magma, is the most deadly part of a volcano. These winds are called “pyroclastic flow” and are very powerful that destroy lots. “The pyroclastic flow is similar to strong wind storms called hurricanes”(Lassieur 3). These winds are often the worst kind of destruction that surrounding land can suffer from. When these winds are active, the surrounding dirt and rock will carry with the winds and possibly increase water levels extraordinarily(Lassieur 3). These loose pieces of rock and dirt could also act as a sort of pollutant of the air. It could also blur the vision distance that you could see. Another reason for a
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Following up the information about the formation and deadliness of volcanoes is an example of a volcano, Mt.Tambora, one of the deadliest volcanoes ever. This volcano erupted over 200 years ago, but made a big impact all around the world. It erupted for three months in total. You could hear the explosions from over 1,000 miles away(Lassieur 4). This covered things in lava and was very hard to recover because the lava cools and hardens turning it into something as hard as bedrock(Lassieur 3). Bedrock is one of the strongest rocks known to man and takes the strongest man-made technology to break through.

Clearly, volcanoes are a very strong disaster that can destroy almost anything. Their winds are the most powerful from the eruption. These are formed from the earth 's crust and the tectonic plates under it. There are three different types of volcanoes that can be formed. I think that Mt.Tambora is one of the biggest and strongest volcanoes ever seen although it erupted over 200 years

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