New Deal Dbq

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At the beginning of the 1930s the era known as the "Roaring Twenties" died and from it emerged one of the hardest times known to Americans. The 1930s were centered on the Great Depression and how to alleviate the millions of Americans who were affected by it. During this era, the American government, led by Franklin D. Roosevelt, attempted to reform the American economy and the lives of the American people. FDR's New Deal policies implemented in response to the Great Depression, were generally ineffective as they were unable to bring the lasting stability that Roosevelt originally called for. His New Deal policies raised controversy over the government's role in the economy and what some critics labeled socialist ideas. These policies additionally…show more content…
The exclusion of women derived from the original feelings of male supremacy: because so many men were losing their jobs and unable to feed their families, it was unfair to provide jobs to women before the men because it was more imperative for men to work. Many women in society contested this sentiment (Document A), but their cries were unheard as Roosevelt and his administration put men first. Although African Americans were supposed to be included in the reforms, they were not treated the same as Whites by the reform administrations and were not given the same amount of aid, if any at all (Document I). The conservatives in America, including the wealthy and those unaffected by the Depression, contested the New Deal as well and deemed it radical or too close to Communism or Socialism. Many said it would not work or be effective (Document B) and unfortunately, they were correct. The New Deal, however beneficial it seemed, couldn't greatly change the predicament of Americans because of the noncompliance of many, but mainly because many were unemployed (Document J). Although it tried to make radical changed during the depression, the New Deal's most important contribution to America was the precedent it set for the government and the laws it secured for…show more content…
The New Deal strengthened the government by creating public reform boards such as the NRA, which were all looked over by the president. This idea gave the public some confidence that their government was trying to help them. This confidence was boosted by the concept of Social Security. Social Security assured Americans that the government would protect them and their families. The New Deal created a new American government, which is similar to the one of the 21st century. This government was stronger, more organized, and had a bond with the public that is necessary to any efficient government (Document H). The role of the federal government was changed for the better by the new deal because Americans began to see that the government maintained the effort to improve the lives in
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