Okonkwo's Fear

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In Chinua Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart, the protagonist Okonkwo is portrayed as a strong, proud, and ambitious man who is driven by fear rather than malice. Throughout the novel, Okonkwo's actions and thoughts reveal that his fear of failure, rejection, and weakness motivates him to become a successful leader in his community. However, some may argue that Okonkwo's actions are motivated by malice, as he is often violent and harsh towards those around him.
One example of Okonkwo's fear-driven behavior is his constant need to prove himself as a successful and powerful leader in his community. He gained much respect for his tribe and himself for wrestlng. Okonkwo has also gained respect by working hard to become a very successful yam farmer. …show more content…

Okonkwo's violence is a physical manifestation of his fear of being seen as weak and inadequate, and he uses it as a way to assert his power and authority over others. Okonkwo's violence is not a desire to harm or hurt others, but rather a way to assert his power and authority.
In addition, Okonkwo's fear of failure and rejection also drives his violent behavior. He is constantly worried about losing his status and prestige in the community, and this fear motivates him to be a strong leader. The narrator says, "He had a great burning ambition to be one of the lords of the clan" (Achebe, 12). This quote highlights Okonkwo's fear of failure and rejection, which motivates him to be a strong leader and assert his power and authority over others.
In conclusion, Okonkwo from Things Fall Apart is driven more by fear than malice. His fear of failure, rejection, and weakness motivates him to become a successful leader in his community. His actions and thoughts reveal that his fear of being seen as weak and inadequate, and of losing his status and prestige in the community, motivates him to be a strong leader. While some may argue that Okonkwo's actions are motivated by malice, it is important to note that his violence is not a desire to harm or hurt others, but rather to protect himself from his

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