Pearl Harbor Speech Rhetorical Essay

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The Best use of Rhetoric

The Pearl Harbor Address to the Nation and the Address to Congress on Women’s Suffrage are both great examples of ethos, pathos, and logos. They are both political messages created to not only rely on facts but to strike emotion in the hearts of the audience, whoever they may be. In the Pearl Harbor Address to the Nation speech given by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on December 8, 1941, in response to one of the most tragic days in U.S. history, to help rally the people of the United States of America to the realization of war between the Japanese and American forces. The Address to Congress on Women’s Suffrage was given by Carrie Chapman Catt to spark a revolt and spur up emotion of great pride in women of all nature to take a stand fight for what is right. Both these speeches use of rhetoric leave both as some of the best but the speech given by Franklin D. Roosevelt was by far more vivid. Both these political speeches sparked something that would later on be idolized in history and english classes as power of rhetoric and not strength. Their use of logos and pathos mainly set the out
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In the speech given by Franklin D. Roosevelt, his use of his position as President, Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy really allows people to understand and connect with is position because the fault of the attack relies on not just that of the Japanese Imperial Navy but on the government to for not being ready. It is a connection, a title, that the common people of the United States of America could rely on and feel comfortable behind. In the speech given by Carrie Chapman Catt, her ethos is weak and unsupported. She relies on her position as a woman activist to help push her already great and powerful logos and ethos. This push actually weakens her great speech with an extremely biased ethos that just wants to get this and address a problem prevalent in times but extremely drawn
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