Socrates Protagoras Analysis

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This is a recorded content going back to around the fourth century B.C. It is fundamentally an exchange recorded by Plato of a discussion between his coach, Socrates, and a man portrayed by Socrates as 'the shrewdest man alive ', Protagoras. The examination rotates for the most part on the most proficient method to characterize uprightness. This discussion happens at the place of Callias, who was facilitating Protagoras while he is in the city. Protagoras was a critic, an instructor of sorts, and was held in high respects by the Greek Philosophers ' general public. Socrates needed to chat with Protagoras not just because of him being the most well-known mastermind in Greece at the time, additionally to discover what precisely he instructs…show more content…
Presently concerning why Socrates is keen on recognizing what Protagoras educates, I for one observe the motivation to be a blend of interest with a touch of envy. Realizing that Protagoras was proclaimed as the best mastermind of his exchange, Socrates needs to recognize what the mystery behind all that buildup…show more content…
He wants justice to better people, not get rid of them. He emphasizes on punishing them with things in their future and make better people out of them. He wants to guide the misguided. He never actually proves that these things will make virtue teachable and does not want to prove it. He finds virtue only necessary within the boundaries of communities. He is in all ways with the foundation of the Greek society and how it is a source of teachable virtue. Socrates claims that parents cannot teach their offspring’s about virtue. Protagoras argues with him and says the opposite. Protagoras claims that virtue as taught and learned during schooling. He also says that the justice system also helps with teaching virtue as it connects to the offspring directly. He believes that virtue and the mother’s tang are correlated as they are both learnt by being part of a community. Protagoras claims that some people are special and can teach virtue, and Protagoras is one of those people. He thinks of himself as a casual thinker, but a deep one that needs to be respected. When he answers questions, he answers in opposite ways providing many answers, which leads to his ambiguous responses. All in all, Protagoras is very
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