Positive Thinking In Louise Ogawa's 'Dear Miss Breed'

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Positive Thinking William Channing once said, “Difficulties are meant to rouse, not discourage. The human spirit is to grow strong by conflict.” In the “Diary of Anne Frank”, Anne is going through hiding from german police and meanwhile, is stuck with her family and anothers. While in “”Dear Miss Breed” by Joanne Oppenheim, Louise Ogawa is writing about her tough times during the war. They both are able to stay positive which proves that having a positive attitude it the best way to respond to conflict. While some might have trouble staying optimistic and may think that the best way to respond to conflict is to just avoid it, people should keep a positive mindset because it helps people cope more easily during arduous times, it has beneficial impacts on others, and having a positive outlook has many health benefits. Having a positive outlook on a situation has many health benefits that include reducing stress, living longer, and gaining self-confidence. For instance, the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research states, “One theory is…show more content…
Negative thoughts will make an individual more inclined to avoid others. In a study about the effects of positive thinking, the article reads, “When you practice positive thinking, a connection with other people happens more easily, as you are open to them, and not so concerned with your own stuff” (Diaz). In the excerpt of “Dear Miss Breed”, Louise Ogawa is able to gain confidence and stay motivated because of others positivity. The passage states, “If American soldiers can endure hardships so can we!" (Oppenheim). Louise is able to deal with hardships because she uses the soldiers and them staying positive during tough times as motivation. Also, when in a positive mood, an individual is most likely to connect more with others, who may then feel enlightened by the presence of happiness and positivity. Therefore, positive mindsets lead to positive impacts on

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