Pros Of Frederick Douglass

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From 1775-1825, citizens of Haiti, British America, Spanish America, and France revolted against their absolutist governments. Inspired by Enlightenment ideas, including equality for all, the power of a ruler comes from the people, and that everyone has unalienable rights that cannot be denied, the citizens of aforementioned colonies and countries successfully replaced the absolutist rulers and were able to gain freedom. These revolutions influenced many other groups of people who had been petitioning for their own rights to act. The fact that these groups were successful gave abolitionists, women’s rights activists, workers’ rights activists, and people moving to end serfdom the confidence that they too could attain their rights. The abolitionist …show more content…

An escaped slave, Douglass was literate and went on to recount his life as a slave in three autobiographies (History.com-Black History-Frederick Douglass). These autobiographies were a direct account of the horrid life of a slave and opened many Northern and Southern people’s eyes to the network that they had always benefited from but had never seen the pure emotional, physical, and psychological damages it caused.The propaganda Douglass provided was very persuasive in favor of abolitionism in the way he described the world and spoke of the true American ideals that not everyone had access to. Douglass in turn was also a huge advocate for abolishing the Jim Crowe Laws and the lynching of black men and women, giving many speeches and writing many papers against it. He also was an editor for a very influential black newspaper that gave black people in America their own voice in society and allowed them to read inspiring essays with tales of escaped slaves to men and women who were working to gain more rights for …show more content…

In other parts of Europe there had been many peasant revolts and though they were quickly distinguished, they became an inspiration to other peasants. In fear of a rebellion, Tsar Alexander II used imperial power to free all serfs in Russia. Serfdom in Russia was also the scapegoat for many of the problems plaguing Russia at the time including food shortages, overpopulation, and the backwardness of Russia. After many debates among the government officials concerning what would be best for the serfs once they were freed, they came up with an agreement. Serfs were allowed land, but the wealthy landowners got the best picks and ex-sefs got the leftovers. This highlights the still present class system in Russia.Even though serfs had been freed they were still being treated as the lowest class, but in turn they were still free to vote and do everything any other free Russian citizen could do, in theory. Things were still unequal and life was hard for the serfs. Serfs who had recently been freed had no means for income and struggled to provide for their families. This arrangement worked in favor for the Russian government because the freed unemployed serfs would join the army and help Russia fight. The serfs did gain their freedom from being emancipated but when they were freed life still wasn’t exactly

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