Qualitative Alzheimer's Disease Analysis

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What is “normal?” How do we define and categorize someone under the “normal” standards when everyone is different? When discussing what is qualitatively and quantitatively different from “normal” we look at characteristics of what normal is and what is considered to be different from “normal” to place it into a category of either disabilities or health issues. Though these symptoms are considered to be qualitatively different from “normal”, they are also quantitatively different because these symptoms can also fit other categories besides a specific disorder. For example, when a person visits a doctor with five symptoms they are experiencing, those symptoms could be broken down from a list of one hundred of the same concern. The terms qualitative …show more content…

Qualitatively, this disease can be seen with senile plaques on the brain, and neurofibrillary tangles that affect physical changes to the brain. Since there are so many branches of dementia, it can be hard to determine which type of dementia a patient is experiencing, needing to be looked at more closely. Some warning signs of this disease include getting lost, paying for bills and trouble managing money, retelling the same stories, repeatedly asking the same questions, and losing/ misplacing items, but not being able to recall how to find them (532). Though not all people progress through this disease at the same pace and times in their lives, these are just some of the few symptoms and abnormalities that those who have Alzheimer’s can display as opposed to someone their age with a normal functioning brain and having no dementia. Quantitatively, research has shown that Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 50-70% of all neurocognitive disorders (531). This disease is one of the subcategories that comes from dementia and is seen to correlate with older age. Some symptoms of this disease are seen about 2-3 years in advance, giving doctors and indication that this patient at some time will be officially diagnosed with dementia. This accounts for extra brain power or …show more content…

Quantitative data for depression shows that women are twice as likely as men to be depressed due to several factors (530). Using quantitative data, we see that the disorder can be shown throughout multiple ethnicities, gender, and age. This makes for the idea that a normal person can have depression. People can be the same person with a disorder and not a completely different person due to their disorder. The qualitative difference from normal would be that only depressed people feel fatigue, sadness, and cognitive deficits that normal people do not experience. Making them different as a person from normal. There are many qualitative differences for instance, people with Bipolar Disorder have symptoms that include, sadness,rapid speaking,unwanted thoughts, delusions, lack of concentration, racing thoughts, disorganized behavior,irritability, aggression, agitation, elevated episodes of emotions and depression, and extreme mood swings that affects 1 out of 45 Americans in the U.S. Though these symptoms are considered to be qualitatively different from “normal”, they are also quantitatively different because these symptoms can also fit other categories besides Bipolar

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