Seclusion And Disruption In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the tale of a mad scientist is told who surpasses the limits of science and what is typically considered to be possible for man to achieve. One of the many underlying stories, though, can be seen in the monster who is created and then brought to life at the beginning of the novel. The monster’s development throughout the novel begins with initially being rejected and neglected by his creator Victor Frankenstein. The monster turns aggressive soon after and seeks revenge on Frankenstein’s family, killing off each one, one at a time. These actions are obviously very unlike that of an average human child, but when you look at his horrendous acts as being in response to negligence by a parental figure, they can…show more content…
In psychiatric wards specifically, the use of seclusion is used to confine and restrict movement in disruptive-behaving children. Although this mechanism is supposed to promote behavioral change and correct disruptive behavior, it actually tends to spark newly manifested behavior, especially aggression. Essentially the question that is raised investigates what takes place in the use of seclusion and restraint to spark these developed behaviors and what could be changed about the processes to avoid it. To understand this question, many topics need to be understood to form an argument. The main categories that are researched under this debate are the methods of seclusion used on adolescents, the overall treatment of patients and the reasoning for them to be admitted in the first place, the predictors of patients needing seclusion and the alarming indicators after experiencing the process, the most common negatively observed effects seen in patients after experiencing the process, and finally the long-term effect that can occur in the brain after a traumatic experience. There is an ever-longing pull to eliminate such potentially harmful mechanisms in the cases of children who are still developing every day and impressionable in every…show more content…
Physical and mechanical restraint can be similarly defined to be “Any device or individual that confines or restricts movement,” whereas chemical restraint is defined to be “Any drug that is used… to either control behavior or to restrict the patient’s freedom of movement that is not typically administered… as being prescribed for a medical treatment or psychiatric condition” (Fryer 27). Clearly, there is a stark difference between the physical and mechanical restraint uses as compared to the chemical, for many would consider injecting an adolescent with a medication that they are not prescribed for as being unlawful. Seclusion of a patient involves confining a patient, voluntarily or involuntarily, to a set space or location without any social interaction, but sometimes the patient is adamant and refuses to adhere to the order. In these cases, the different forms of restraint can appear to attain the ultimate objective of seclusion. In a particular study, the cases of seclusions were recorded in several different pediatric psychiatric hospitals and wards to reveal that 94.8% of all seclusions required the use of physical or mechanical restraint to be achieved and that 4.5% of these same seclusions required the use of chemical restraint (Gullick 40). In the cases of these chemical
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