Alienation In Nursing

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Through the calculated isolation of a person or group comes the term ‘Alienation’. One is secluded from a part of the world that they may occupy, whether physically, emotionally, or in a variety of other ways, despite the fact that they are deserving of being part of that space. The working-class people are alienated from their work. They are more so economically isolated from their product, but social estrangement tends to take place along with it as the buying and owning of their product separates those who can afford to own it and those who can barely afford to make it. While they may have crafted the product, they do not own it, and as they continue to make more in abundance, they continue to lose the wealth they were promised with this…show more content…
As a nursing student, clinicals involve us students to be under the watchful eye of both a clinical instructor and a nurse at the facility. Despite being a nursing student, we are not at all considered nurses, and are not allowed to do several of the interventions and procedures ‘real’ nurses are allowed to do. While we rightfully should not perform anything we have yet to master, students are alienated from the nurses at the facility in that we have an exceptional amount of limitations to what we can and cannot do, amounting to legal actions should we perform any of the “cannots.” We are inferior by all accounts, not because we lack the skills or intellect to accomplish said skills, but because we have yet to be taught them. We do not know nearly as much as our superior counterparts, we have not even begun to experience the kind of struggle and loss that they have, and we have yet to master any skill the way they have. Student nurses are not comparable to the facility nurses, and it amounts to a sense of isolation. We versus…show more content…
We are not one of them just yet, and while we can relate to them as being where they used to be, in nursing school, we cannot yet relate to them regarding experience and capability. Furthermore, nurses tend to be separated from doctors in a particularly different way than students are from nurses. Commonly thought of as inferior and subordinate to doctors, nurses are often portrayed as lowly in the medical hierarchy, separate and unequal to the other medical professionals, despite being just as important as the doctors of the facility. As the last line of defense, Nurses act as almost personal protectors against medical errors for the patients, but they are more so considered maids, the fetchers, instead of the scientific, medical professional they
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