Social Changes In The 1920's

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The 1920’s was an uprising decade known as “the roaring twenties”. Big changes came with the 1920’s, new fashions, new technologies. Women began to have more rights, and Prohibition. Many People called the 1920’s the “age of excess” because American people could afford and buy anything they wanted. The 1920’s made america what it is today. The success in the 1920’s was a decade of economic progress, women had more rights, and the 18th Amendment was ratified. The 1920’s was a decade of economic progress, the middle class could buy and afford more, “the United States went through a period of extreme social change. As the post-world war I economy boomed, mass consumerism changed the way people lived their lives and made manufactured good…show more content…
Many young women began to smoke cigarettes they began to drink alcohol in public. The 19th Amendment was passed. The 1920’s was a era of the flappers, “the flapper with her short skirts, short hair, not noticeable makeup, and fun loving attitude represented a new freedom for women.” (Benner, 2004) A supreme court case on June, 8 1925 was Gitlow V. New York, “Gitlow Illustrated one of the court’s earliest attempts at incorporation, that is, the process by which provision in the bill of rights has been applied to the states. A socialist named Benjamin Gitlow printed an article advocating the forceful overthrow of the government and was arrested pursuant to New York state law. Gitlow argued that the first Amendment guaranteed freedom of speech and the press. On appeal, the supreme court expressed that the first amendment applied to New York through the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment. However, the court ultimately ruled that Gitlow’s Speech was not protected under the First Amendment by applying the “clear and present danger” test. The court 's ruling was the first of many instances of incorporating the bill of rights.” (NCC Staff, 2016) American’s attitudes were that they should have free speech protections for
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