Tejay Johnson Case Study

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January 9, 2018- 26 year old Tejay Johnson finds himself along his attorney Ian Goldman in front of Superior Court Judge Dennis Nieves to find out his fate for convicting over 30 robberies in the first degree along with 14 other former Rutgers players. Johnson was on trail with the possibility of having to sever 150 ½ years in prison without parole. The case of Tejay Johnson was handled in New Jersey Superior Court in New Brunswick was unjust as a penalty that high would serve as a bad example of the state. The facts of the story to this still preceding case is as follows: Johnson had pled guilty to three counts if robbery in first degree, three armed robbery in second degree, and three counts of conspiracy to commit other robberies in second …show more content…

If a weapon was used, weapons charges mandate a prison sentence of at least three-and-a-half years. threating another being in fear of bodily harm. In Johnson’s cases armed robbery according to New Jersey, it includes all robberies committed in first degree along with the weapon is a mandate sentence of three and a half years. Johnson had committed over 30 robberies while going to the university and with a weapon being included in almost all of them, it continued to add on to his years that he’ll have to serve in jail leading up to the 150 ½ years that Johnson will have to serve. Johnson also had many critical incriminating text messages and fingerprints as well. Text messages with pictures and conversations that were about the series of …show more content…

The defenses’ argument was to let Johnson only sever for 15 years in exchange. Goldman proposed to have the court consider the appeal before the sentence claiming that it would “cause irreparable harm to his client.” As well as the other attorney’s representing the others who were arrested had them “not guilty pleas on their behalf and called the six-figure bails excessive (Bichao).” The other members that were also caught in relation to the robberies weren’t treated as harsh than

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