The Impact Of Frankenstein In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is a gothic horror novel about how, after weeks of being at sea, explorer Robert Walton comes across a very ill man named Victor Frankenstein. In a series of letters to his sister in England, he retells Victor’s story of the creation he made and how it forever changed his life. In the novel Frankenstein, readers know the real monster is Victor Frankenstein because he was selfish and only focused on himself, abandoned his creation, and let other people die as a result of his actions. In the beginning, Victor Frankenstein starts to show how selfish he truly is by ignoring his family’s requests to write letters to them while he is away. Instead, Frankenstein spends all of his time focusing on himself and bringing…show more content…
From the moment Frankenstein’s creature is brought to life, Frankenstein is constantly running away from him and not showing the creature any affection. So much that, once Frankenstein and his creation reunite for the first time, Frankenstein greets his creation by calling him rude words, such as “devil.” Frankenstein 's creation explains how, due to the way Frankenstein abandoned him, he was expecting Frankenstein to treat him rudely and says, “.....must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet You, my creator, abhor me” (Shelley 68). The creation goes on to explain the impact that Frankenstein abandoning him had on his life and how, if it wasn 't for Frankenstein’s negligence, he would have never murdered anyone. In this part of the novel, readers begin to sympathize with Frankenstein’s creation because of the way he was mistreated and excluded. Readers then discover that it is actually Frankenstein who is the monster and not his creation, despite what other media sources, such as movies, have portrayed because Frankenstein does not show any sign of remorse or sympathy for abandoning his creature and making his life…show more content…
When trying to justify his actions, Frankenstein says, “...such a declaration would have been considered as the ravings of a madman, and would not have exculpated her who suffered through me” (Shelley 54). Once again, Frankenstein is only thinking about himself, instead of taking responsibility for the actions of his creation. Instead of feeling sorry for Justine, Frankenstein is trying to justify to himself why he should not feel bad for not telling everyone the truth. Several more people die throughout the novel and Frankenstein still does not say anything. The fact that Frankenstein was able to let other people die and still not admit fault, knowing it could save the lives of others, is another reason why Frankenstein is truly the monster of the story. If Frankenstein had any compassion for others, he would have let everyone know the truth and save them from his creation. Unfortunately, Frankenstein, being the monster he is, never does tell anyone the truth and almost everyone close to him dies as a result. Frankenstein didn 't ever physically murder anyone, however, he knew his creation would and never spoke up. Therefore, he is just as guilty as his
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