The Symbolism Of 14 Bears In Evelyn Scott's Big Golden Book

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A large lapbook with a cover featuring a number of bears with appealing smiles holds the title, “The Story of Fourteen Bears.” Appropriate, one might think, assuming the story is about 14 bears. And in fact, when the book spine cracks open, little minds will discover that yes, there are 14 bears. And yes, this is their story. But what this “Big Golden Book,” by Evelyn Scott does not at first express, is the depth that lies between the relationship and customs of these specific bears. On the very first spread, depicting the title page and an illustrated picture of a number of bears enjoying ice cream cones, the major concept of the story is introduced. There is a group of bears, seemingly friends if not relatives, and they can be counted. …show more content…

“Once upon a time there were fourteen bears.” In this picture, they are no longer lined up on a log, easy to count in a row. Instead this page invites a challenge, with busy bears engaged in activities like perching on front stoops, playing ball, painting pictures, and reading books. But yes, there are still 14 of them. Some of them are engaging with each other, playing a game of tag, or catch. A few bears, however, are enjoying independent activity-strumming a guitar and printing letters. However, all of the bears wear a smile and seem generally happy in what they are …show more content…

“Everyday the fourteen bears walked paw in paw through the forest.” In the three simple words of, “paw in paw,” Scott has introduced the concept of coming together. They are still the “fourteen bears” but now they have also become one, with paws connected. It doesn’t matter that one of them is holding a book and one has a purse in their clutch. Anna, a white bear with a ballet tutu is now holding hands with Romana, a chestnut brown bear playing the harmonica. Scott has basically illustrated the opposite of prejudice in a way a young audience will

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