Treatment Act 1974

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The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act of 1974 is the federal policy that addresses issues and concerns in regards to child abuse and neglect. The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act was sanctioned on January 31, 1974, and gives government subsidizing to States in support of counteractive action, appraisal, examination, indictment, and treatment exercises furthermore gives awards to open offices and philanthropic associations, including Indian Tribes and Tribal associations, for showing projects and tasks. President Nixon was in charge of sanctioning the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act of 1974. This act defined child abuse and neglect as "the physical or mental damage, sexual abuse, careless treatment, or abuse of children …show more content…

The subject of child abuse made headlines in America again in the year 1962, when an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association described the symptoms of child abuse and considered child abuse to be diagnosed medically. Due to the heavy press and media coverage around this one particular article, inside 10 years each state had statutes known as "obligatory reporting”. Compulsory reporting laws require certain experts, for example, specialists, and educators, to report speculated children mishandle to the state, child defensive administrations office or other appropriate powers. CAPTA was marked into government law. This further supported endeavor to end child mishandle by financing programs that help people perceive and report child abuse and to give shelter and numerous different administrations to ensure …show more content…

The 1974 Act was also created to provide the institutional support necessary to sustain adequate treatment and preventive services that were widely lacking across the country. Even though CAPTA was passed, child defensive specialists were for the most part not given the preparation, attitudes, and subordinate administrations important to meet their critical obligations. In almost every community in the nation, there were errors, failures, and insufficient coordination in the child protection process. Reports were expanding speedier than offices could deal with them, yet discovery and reports remained disorganized and unfinished; investigations were often done late or inadequately performed, and appropriate treatment projects were practically nonexistent for the dominant

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