Russia And Japan Industrialization Analysis

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America was industrializing in the late eighteenth century, which was a movement of industry and factories, and an influx of workers going to the factories to earn money for their everyday lives, which led to many people getting new jobs and fewer people having zero money at all. To the east of America were two other big countries who were trying to industrialize as well. Japan and Russia specifically were industrializing between 1850 and 1914, which affected the industry of both countries. This included factories being converted to automated machinery, however, as a result of the industrialization, Russia was treating its workers much worse than how Japan treated theirs. An example of this is how Russia paid its workers a lot less that what…show more content…
Before this industrialization in 1968, was the Boshin war, which was directly responsible for the Meiji Restoration, due to the fact that after the war, Japan wanted to have one central power, which resulted in Japan’s government wanting to become like an already successful government with one central power, America, however they did not want America’s culture, but merely the style of government, which resulted in Japan becoming much more western. Then after the war, the Meiji Restoration started, which was the new government taking over Japan, this started a westernization movement in Japan, and during this westernization, industrialization started, and then it settled all throughout Japan, building factories, and machines. Similar to this, Russia experienced the Crimean war, which was essentially a wake-up call for Russia to industrialize after it’s terrible loss to both Britain and France, to add to the losses, after that, Japan and Russia fought, and Russia lost horribly, which shocked the entire…show more content…
This was similar to the United States of America, as the US was also trying to industrialize with a purpose of factories and people working in them. A big factor of the industrialization that both America and Russia shared was that both of these countries had a very unfair system for workers. The pay was not great, and people who were poor had it even worse. There is even an old saying that fits this very well, “The rich get richer”. This is true because the people who were already poor, who were working for the money so they could afford things like homes, food, water, and clothing, were staying poor, because their pay was so low that at the rate of them using their money for necessities, they were earning barely enough to afford them. Whereas the people who were already rich, merely used their money to get even more money, and it would grow exponentially. They could have bought stocks or decided to invest in companies, but either way, they would have the money to do it, whereas the poor people would barely have the money to even live. Everything about these unfair conditions of working was true in both countries, in Russia and
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