Concussions In Sports: A Case Study

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Group and Topic The group was composed of Korbett, Emanuel and Joshua. The primary duty was to research various accelerometers that were designed for use in sports without helmets such as volleyball, soccer and boxing. Background The Project as a whole is focused on concussions. Concussions are a form of traumatic brain injury that interferes with normal brain functions. Concussions are caused by a blow to the head or by heavy shaking of the head or upper body. Inertia causes the brain to move relative to the skull. The impacts impair the brain 's ability to function. Symptoms include, but are not limited to: headache, loss of consciousness, confusion, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and slurred speech. Numerous symptoms are also not noticeable immediately and may appear even days after the injury. Lastly concussions can cause serious, and even deadly brain damage and should not be taken lightly as such. These include but are not limited to disturbances in sleep and irritability. Because concussions are caused by changes in acceleration, accelerometers can be used to attempt to determine if a player may have received a concussion. It is important to note that accelerometers measure changes in acceleration, not damage to the brain. The only way to check for a concussion on the field is to remove the player from the game and search for the symptoms (“Concussion”). Introduction to Topic Our topic was to research accelerometers that are not attached to a helmet. This is important because concussions are quite common in sports…show more content…
References "Acceleration And G Forces." – An Overview By Experts In The Field. Web. 12 Jan. 2016. "Accelerometers Tackle Football Concussions." Accelerometers Tackle Football Concussions. Web. 12 Jan. 2016.. "Concussion." - Mayo Clinic. Web. 11 Jan. 2016. . "Reebok CHECKLIGHT - Black | Reebok US." Reebok United States. Web. 12 Jan. 2016. . "SIM-G by Triax: Our Head Impact Monitoring Solution for Teams." Triax Technologies Inc. Web. 12 Jan. 2016.
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