Firewatch Character Analysis

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Firewatch is a first-person mystery adventure game developed by Campo Santo and published in cooperation with Panic. Firewatch 's narrative examines themes of guilt, isolationism, and escapism in the evocative setting of the Shoshone National Park. Should you spend the summer leaving the real world behind and keep a lookout for fires in Firewatch? ESCAPE TO THE SHOSHONE Despite his level of intoxication, Henry will never forget that fateful night in 1975. In a college bar somewhere in Boulder, Colorado, Henry 's gaze is transfixed on the most infatuating woman he has ever laid eyes on before. Her infectious laugh serenades Henry and feels he has no other choice but approach this seductive being. He shuffles across the bar and clumsily…show more content…
But, in addition to being a character study about coming to terms with oneself, Campo Santo also details a more immediate mystery to unravel in Firewatch. Because it quickly becomes apparent that something is amiss at Shoshone; a poorly handled confrontation with some careless campers combined with a sneaking suspicion they are being watched instills a sense of dread in the newfound friends. But, sadly, I feel that Firewatch 's plot is its least enjoyable aspect; in particular when contrasted to the well-written character study. And while I suspect Campo Santo were attempting to imbue the mystery with paranoia caused by the isolationism, they are unsuccessful in doing so satisfactorily. In particular, because the mystery is rendered nigh-on insignificant by its unlikely, and unrewarding, conclusion - it feels as if you are being strung along different avenues by multiple poorly conceived red herrings that all fail to amount to anything resembling meaningful. Which is a terrible shame, because its lackluster execution severely detracted from my enjoyment of Firewatch - to the point where I feel Firewatch would be a better experience without its…show more content…
The majority of your time in Firewatch will be spent engaging with the conversation system. Because as Henry explores the Shoshone he keeps a running dialogue with Delilah going via his walkie-talkie. Firewatch often tasks you with determining how Henry responds to Delilah 's queries or how he reacts to something she says or that is happening around him. And the conversation flows more or less effortlessly regardless of your input. As previously mentioned, the quality of the writing ensures the conversations are engaging throughout. In a more mechanical sense, Campo Santo manages to use the conversation system, in tandem with the navigation, as its primary method of advancing the story. Because Henry will report on his findings, which prompts a discussion resulting in Henry obtaining a new location to explore. The symbiotic relationship between the conversation- and navigational systems work well in Firewatch, resulting in an experience that feels guided and focused. Even despite some inconsequential, superfluous methods of engagement, like the photography mode, one cannot escape the fact that there isn 't much going on mechanically in Firewatch. And this lack of meaningful interaction means that a pre-existing affinity for narrative-driven experiences is essential and that Firewatch 's story manages to engross you. And I am somewhat torn; the inter-personal drama, characterization, and character study portions of the narrative are some of the best I have ever
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