Frankenstein Double Analysis

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In literature, a doppelganger is a device used to shape a protagonist’s double. This double exhibits the ability to impersonate their original, but can also possess different morals and ethics that revolve around bringing a dilemma to the protagonist. The Double by Fyodor Dostoevsky uses the idea of a doppelganger when the main character, Golyadkin, finds an exact double of himself upon travel. His double ultimately has a goal of destroying Golyadkin’s reputation because he has the social skills that Golyadkin doesn’t, which creates madness in both characters. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein reveals that Victor Frankenstein, the protagonist, and his monster each control different aspects that make up one human being. Frankenstein represents the …show more content…

Drastically impacted by the time spent on the creation of his monster, Frankenstein finds that he not only ignored his own life, but also the lives of those who surround him. Frankenstein’s realization of his isolation is apparent when, “the same feelings which made [him] neglect the scenes around [him] caused [him] also to forget those friends who were so many miles absent, and whom [he] had not seen for so long a time” (40). The root of Frankenstein’s isolation was the two years spent on the creation of his monster, as he was separated from all of society. In the context of the novel, the words “neglect” and “absent” reveal Frankenstein’s isolation atop of his limited emotion. Frankenstein’s representation as the brain of the body reflects on his longing desire to feel emotion as a result of his isolated emotions. After realizing his loneliness, Frankenstein bestows himself a sense of encouragement to come out of his isolation. Frankenstein realizes that, “the energy of [his] purpose alone sustained [him]... [he] believed that exercise and amusement would then drive away incipient disease” (41). Inevitably vulnerable, Frankenstein comes to realize his obsession with the idea of creating life and ultimately realizes that he has forgotten about the people who surround him. The denotation of the word “incipient” correlates to an initial stage. Shelley’s use of the word …show more content…

The monster’s emotion ultimately represents the heart of the body, which Frankenstein fails to pay attention to, yet longs to have. The observance of others emotions helps the monster realize that, “[humans] were not entirely happy… [he] saw no cause for their unhappiness, but [he] was deeply affected by it” (91). The monster, after being left to fend for himself, lacks an understanding of emotional displacement. The use of the phrase, “deeply affected” reveals the monster’s desire to understand the idea of emotions and the actions behind them. Seeking to expand his knowledge, the monster discovers that many of the emotions he reads in literature apply to himself. The monster comes to realize that, “[he] applied much personally to [his] own feelings and conditions… [his] person was hideous and [his] stature gigantic” (109). The monster ultimately displays a longing interest in expanding his knowledge, but each time he tries to apply it, he gets turned away because of his appearance. The use of the words “hideous” and “gigantic” ultimately reveals the monster’s self-doubt as his appearance undermines his capability. Mary Shelley’s stance on the idea of feminism results from her desire to prove that reproduction cannot take place without a woman. In the time period Frankenstein was written, the idea of separate spheres created a gap between

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