How To Quit Valley Forge Dbq

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The Continental Army was having a very rough time in the winter of 1777. At Valley Forge, George Washington built a winter camp there. That’s where the soldiers lived and worked. The conditions at the camp were terrible. It was a very difficult place to live because it was very cold, they had worn-out shoes and socks, and sickness was spreading. Since it was so bad some of the soldiers were leaving, but others were staying loyal. Now, if I was a soldier at in Washington’s army and I had to ask myself the question: Would have I quit at Valley Forge? My answer is no, I wouldn’t have quit at Valley Forge because only 15% of all people there died, there is help on the way, and because of the inspirational words of Thomas Paine. The first reason I have for staying is that just 15% of all people at Valley Forge actually died, that is not enough to make to quit. The first piece of evidence I have, comes from Document A. On February 1st, 1778 3,989 out of 8,000 soldiers were sick. Clearly these numbers show that just under 50% were sick, which is a lot of people. So, there was a high amount of illness spreading throughout the camp, but not all of those people who were sick, actually died. My second piece of evidence also comes from Document A. It says that 1,800 out of 12,000 soldiers died. This evidence explains that even though half are sick, which is a lot, only 15% are dying. That means that I have a low chance of dying at Valley Forge.…show more content…
In Document B it states that the Congressional Committee, “was helpful in getting more food and clothing to the soldiers.” This evidence tells me that the Congress is providing more supplies to the army, which they desperately need. In Document B it also states that, “The committee… stayed several weeks” This obviously explains that the Committee gave the army extra help. But more importantly, it shows the Committee cared enough to stay and help the
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