Social Issues In Sociology

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1. Identifying the social issues: According to the lecture notes complied by Cloete (2011:4), the basic definition of sociology is, that it is “the scientific study of social relations.” Practically, this means that sociologists investigate social relations, which are founded through meaningful social interactions that take place within the social structures that exist and become established through the ongoing social processes, which in turn creates the culture of that society. At an individual level, these social experiences and relations establish a person’s identity and concept of self (his or her personality). Therefore, in identifying the social issues that exist, we have to analyse them from all the different aspects of the social relations…show more content…
Children require both the input from a mother and father to develop optimally. But, a lot of these children are growing up without role models in terms of their parental figures, because either their father or mother or both, have chosen a life of crime and violence, in most cases more specifically a life devoted to gangsterism. In some cases these children grow up either with their mothers, aunts or grandmothers and have to deal with issues of loss, rejection and abandonment, as a result of growing up without a father figure, which has a far-reaching, significant psychological and social impact later on, in these children’s lives, as they may experience feelings of self-hatred and self-pity, which affects their concept of self. Ironically, these deep-rooted inner feelings will hinder their ability to form healthy relationships with those around them, and thus they will inevitability perpetuate the cycle of destructive behaviour patterns in their romantic and other relationships. These feelings of inner pain may even propel them to abuse drugs to “cope” with the loss and sense of confusion they feel or their desire for a sense of community may be so powerful that it draws them into a life of gangsterism. According to Woolard (2002), fragmentation of the family, the breaking down of the family…show more content…
The Western Cape is run by the DA and the members in this community believe that the government is also punishing them for not voting for the ANC. Some members of the community also express that while they were discriminated against under the white government, they at least had jobs and an education, but under the rule of the new regime they are still experiencing discrimination and racism; however now they are also without money and an education. People in the community have learnt to live a life of high alert, as at any moment gang wars may break out and kill innocent victims in their cross-fire shooting. Most of the gangsters own taxis, as this is a “multi-million dollar” industry, and often taxi wars break out, because gangsters want to claim certain areas for their operation. Gang-owned taxis often drive around illegally without a taxi permit. The government’s answer to the problem is to impound the taxi, charge a penalty fee and to return the taxi again. This doesn’t alleviate the problem, but keeps it going and generates money for the
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