The Ethical Dilemma Of Abortion

1135 Words5 Pages
One of the most widely debated moral issues in America, and indeed worldwide, is that of abortion. It has had implications that have been contested in the highest levels of courts, to include the 1973 Supreme Court case of Roe v. Wade. Although the court decided, by a great margin, in favor of a woman’s right to choose whether or not to carry out a pregnancy, the consequences of this choice have, and continue to be, an ethical and political hotbed for debate. This decision, however, only takes into account the impact that an abortion, or birth, has on the state, not the individual, in accordance with the 14th amendment to The Constitution of The United States (Dunaway, 2011), and the rights outlined in The Declaration of Independence. To…show more content…
That is to say, at what point does a person develop a consciousness that defines them as human? Another aspect to the dilemma is whether or not carrying out a pregnancy will cause undue harm to the individual or caretaker. According to the Bible, God has called upon everyone before birth (Isaiah 49:1), and God has a purpose for everybody (Jeremiah 29:11). With this consideration, the argument for abortion becomes apparently unethical, and undeniably blasphemous. The two prevailing courses of action to counter this dilemma involve intervention before conception. The first solution is the easiest form of removing this dilemma entirely. A strict abstinence from sexual activity until one is ready, physically, emotionally, and financially, to undertake the responsibility of conceiving and raising a child, is undoubtedly the most practical means to remove the presence of this predicament. The second resolution for the issue of abortion is that of contraceptive and prophylactic devices. Beyond the intended purpose of preventing the spread of disease, condoms can be an effective way for couples to express their intimacy without submitting themselves to the responsibility of child rearing. Additionally, the use of contraception, although not proven to be 100 percent effective, can satisfy the same means. These methods, however, have been widely condemned by the…show more content…
Christianity teaches both the totality of life at conception, as well as the value of human life. Two solutions emerge which propose arbitration before conception, rather than after. Although medical and technical forms of intervention are available, as well as effective, these methods are publicly decried by Christian leadership as inconsistent with God’s intent. Hence, the more practical solution of abstinence takes the vanguard position for those opposed to abortion, though it has the potential to create conflict within a relationship where both individuals are not prepared to accept the
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