The Impact Of D-Day During World War II

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On that fateful day of June 6, 1944, 2,499 soldiers died in combat. This was the cause of a part of a war that impacted many people. This war was WWII, between the Nazis and the Allies. The Nazis were lead by Hitler, who planned to control Europe. During World War II, D-Day impacted the war and it’s outcome significantly. Firstly, the state of Europe contributed to the start of D-Day. Secondly, the attack needed goals to be successful for both sides, but only one side would emerge in victory. Lastly, the events of D-Day contributed to the outcome of the war. Firstly, the state of Europe contributed to the start of D-Day. Hitler had taken control of the Nazi party in 1921 and was starting to take action. He started to invade neighboring countries…show more content…
D-Day was on June 6, 1944, and was to become a naval, land, and air attack on Nazi-controlled France. The attack was a team of the American, Canadian, and British armies, “D-Day required unprecedented cooperation between international armed forces.” (Jalter 1) The code name for the mission was “Overlord.” Ground troops landed at several beaches and captured them. Lieutenant-general Frederick Morgan lead the armies into battle and General Dwight D. Eisenhower planned the attack. D-day did not end WWII, but it did make a contribution to the end of the war and impacted the people in it. These were the events that led to the outcome of D-Day. In conclusion, the state of Europe and the planning and events of D-Day led to the outcome, impacting the war and who would be victorious. D-Day impacted the war a lot because if D-Day hadn’t had happened, Russia would have fallen and Germany would have taken over because of a surprise attack on the country. The Allies wouldn’t have liberated parts of France and defeat Hitler’s armies. Eventually leading to Hitler’s suicide on April 30, 1945. To sum it up, without D-Day the war’s outcome could have been completely

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