Women's Role In The Civil War Dbq

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Throughout history women have constantly had fewer constitutional rights and profession openings than men, primarily because women have continuously been considered inferior to men. The working class also possessed fewer rights during the 1800s. Workers were bound to their employers and had little to no rights. As the years moved on, much of that began to change. Employed citizens had little to no voting rights, and they kept trying until they achieved what they wanted. Inspired by this, women saw the success and decided to fight for their own rights. This set women on a path to seek and secure all women political rights. Through peaceful protests, publicity stunts, and nonviolent militant force, women and some men attempted to gain political…show more content…
It began to pick up steam in the 1850s, but was shut down because of the Civil War. The movement began in the years before the war, but received a major hindrance as the war started. Although women were enforced to go back to their domestic lives, the time period of the Civil War was a turning point for women. Women began gaining more recognition for their roles in the Civil War, and that was a huge motivation for women’s rights. People began to support women’s rights, and that was a huge win for advocates. People such as John Stuart Mill were passionate advocates for women’s rights. In document 1, Mill begins by saying that traditionally, the vocation of a woman is the place of a wife and mother. He believes that one is supposed to consider of women in that way, but in truth, he recognizes that by denying women the same opportunities as men, the world is denied of the talents of women. He wrote The Subjection of Women with the help of his wife. Though he was already an advocate for fairness, his wife educated him on the real-world consequences of women’s legal submission. He even took it as far as losing his seat in parliament to stand by his views. Similar to Mill, Emmeline Pankhurst was also a women’s rights activist. She realized that men were so empowered because of what they were allowed to have, such as an education, and it put men above women. She fought to change that, and fought for women’s rights. Most men in parliament thought that women would not comprehend how it operated, so they should not take part in it. This angered many women, so Pankhurst established the Women’s Social and Political Union to empower women in Europe. The unification became recognized as the Suffragettes. Members of this group were ready to use forcefulness to achieve what they pursued. Though they didn’t use violence as a first choice, they went on hunger strikes in prison. The government was alarmed that
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