American Indian Analysis

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It is 1757, the French and Indian War rages across the English Colonies and the British have been fighting the French for territory in North America for three years. Indian tribes fight on both sides and the colonists are caught in the middle. Three men, Chingachgook, his son Uncas, and adopted white son Hawkeye, visit the frontier home of the Cameron 's. John, Alexandra, and James live there. A colonist named Jack Winthrop tells Hawkeye that he is gathering volunteers to fight for the British army in hopes that their homes on the frontier will be guarded against Huron war party attacks, loyal to the French. He and a group of others leave the next morning for Albany in New York to obtain these terms of agreement from General Webb. Webb agrees…show more content…
The garrison is commanded by Major Duncan Howard (Steven Waddington) who is betrothed to Cora. Their route to Fort William Henry is led by a native guide named Magua who acts distant towards Duncan and expresses dissent towards the British in his native language, though Duncan is unaware that anything is amiss. Magua then, without reason, turns and walks toward the back of the formation and the garrison is suddenly ambushed by a Huron war party. The women are knocked off their horses and huddle in the undergrowth together as they watch helplessly as the British soldiers are overtaken. At that moment, Chingachgook arrives with Uncas and Hawkeye and fight off the remaining Huron. Magua himself takes aim at Cora but Hawkeye forces him to flee into the forest. When the dust settles, only Cora, Alice, and Duncan are left alive. Hawkeye filters supplies from the dead and assures the survivors that he and his companions will escort them to Fort William Henry. Uncas sends off the remaining horses, explaining that they 're too loud and easy to track. The party sets off on…show more content…
Days pass without reinforcements and it 's soon discovered that Hawkeye assisted his colonist friends in abandoning the fort. He is arrested for sedition and sentenced to hang. When Cora questions him, asking why he didn 't leave too, he claims his only interest remains in the fort: her. She confronts her father, proudly asserting her beliefs that, maybe, the British do more harm to the colonists than good. The fort is soon overrun by the French and Munroe is forced by Montcalm to surrender. The British are allowed to leave the fort with their families to Albany, on condition that they return to England. Reluctantly, Munroe accepts but only after seeing an intercepted letter from General Webb, explaining his
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