Anthony Ant Character Analysis

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Anthony --- or Ant, as he prefers to be called --- doesn’t love everything about the mean, harsh streets of East Cleveland, but its his home. However, when things take a turn for the really, really worse, he accepts the scholarship offer he’s gotten from a fancy boarding school in Maine and heads there for his freshman year of high school. Ant knows it will be a major adjustment, but some of the changes aren’t exactly the ones he expects. For one, everyone wants to call him Tony. For another, they all believe he can play basketball because I guess he 's black, even though he’s short and prefers football. They also think he’s from New York. Ant is frustrated yet willing to stick with it. He seeks out the other black students at Belton Academy but finds that he doesn’t quite fit in with them, either. They are all from New York and think his slang is weird. And even though they all know each other and share the common bond of being the few minority students at a wealthy, white school, within their small group are two headstrong opinions of what it means to be black and how a…show more content…
His adviser takes an interest in him and encourages him to run for student government. When Ant goes home for winter break, he’s not totally cut off from his old friends, though he understands that he’ll never have quite the same connection to them as he did before Belton. BLACK BOY, WHITE SCHOOL is a sophisticated novel about social structures, racial politics and identity. the authour Brian F. Walker deals with issues of low income, urban life, and the struggle that is required of minority students in private schools who are caught between keeping their cultural and social branch of home while becoming a fully being member of their new school communities in a manner that is fair, thoughtful and not sexy or romanic of some sort. At the end of the story, not all issues are resolved, just as in real
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