Ehr In Nursing

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Findings EHR implementation in a hospital setting is an efficient tool if utilized correctly. However, through literary review we found that several factors can affect its success rate in various ways, making it more difficult to achieve. Based on our findings, we grouped key concerns that impact success into three major categories, which are as follows: role and perspective, process of implementation, and financial barriers. It is important to note that though we separated them into different categories, some issues from one section may overlap with that of another. For example, nursing roles will be discussed in “role and perspective,” but they are also heavily involved with the issue of quality of care found under “process of implementation.”…show more content…
Yet, their roles in regards to EHR have generally been largely overlooked, regardless of the fact that several tasks fall under their supervision (Pine et. al., 2015). This may have been due to the notion that physician support is crucial for successful implementation (Palvia et al., 2015). Nonetheless, their participation is equally significant due to their personal nature with patients. To elaborate, the constant documentation that EHR entails may either improve or interfere with the relationship between nurses and patients, thus impacting the success rate of EHR implementation. As a result, we investigated their position more in depth and found that many were confident and found it user friendly, but nurses with greater computer literacy were more likely to favor EHR (Moody et al., 2004). They were surveyed about their EHR use and of the 120 questionnaires, only 100 were usable. Of those 100 about 98% were white and female with about an equal number working at night and an equal number working during the day. About 96% indicated they felt confident using the EHR system and 85% felt it was user friendly. However, more than half indicated that there were some interruptions while reporting patient care. An estimated 76% of nurses reported they believed the EHR system would have a positive effect on improving patient care over time. Approximately 54% reported they had alternative methods of recording information such as scrap pieces of paper and later transcribing it into the patient’s electronic chart (Moody et al., 2004). Consequently, the issue of usability comes into play and the study implicates that communication between EHR providers should not be limited to just physicians, but to nurses as
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