Emotional Intelligence

1252 Words6 Pages
"All learning has an emotional base" - Plato. It is important to control and express our emotions, however it is our ability to comprehend, interpret and respond to the emotions of other people. It is called Emotional Intelligence which brings us to the discussion of this issue in this report. The definition of emotional intelligence ( EI ) in the texbook is defined as a person's ability to perceive emotions in the self and others, understand the meaning of these emotions and regulate one's emotions accordingly in a cascading model. In other words, the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and the feelings of others, for motivating others, and for managing emotons well in ourselves and in our relationships. "People who understand their…show more content…
Meaning that this was our ability to get along well with others. In 1940s, David Wechsler suggested the idea of affective components of intelligence may be essential to success in life. So how smart we are, determine how far we go in life. In 1990, psychologists Peter Salovey at Yale and John Mayer who studied at the University of new Hampshire published the article of "Emotional Intelligence" in the journal Imagination, Cognition and Personality. Both psychologists have been the leading researchers on emotional intelligence. In their article " Emotional Intelligence", the definiton of emotional intelligence is defined as " the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and…show more content…
According to some studies, they suggest that there is a negative aspect of trying to alter the way we feel. Changing our emotions takes effort and this effort can be grueling. Sometimes, the effort of changing our emotions can makes the emotions grow stronger. For example, when we try to talk ourselves out of being afraid actually it can make us focus more on what scares us which unfortunately makes us more afraid. Emotion repression seems to be tough to do effectively and may lead to more negative emotions; reevaluating the circumstances is usually more effective in increasing positive and good emotions and minimizing negative emotions. Then in 1995, the concept of emotional intelligence is popularized after publication of physcologist, the New York Times Science writer, Danial Goleman's book Emotional Intelligence : Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, which brought emotional intelligence into the mainstream of
Open Document