The Four Generations

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Four Generational partners • The four generational cohorts discussed in this article include the Veteran Generation, the Baby Boomer Generation, Generation X, and the Millennial Generation. This section will describe and illustrate the historical, social, and cultural experiences of each generation which have formed the mental models so often seen in each of these generations. • Veteran Generation (Born between 1922 and 1945) • The childhood world of our most senior nurses, members of the Veteran Generation, was dramatically different than the one we live in today. News came largely from newspapers and radio; long-distance phone calls were a rare and expensive occurrence; shopping was mostly done at locally owned stores; and movies were only…show more content…
Their early work environments were large, bureaucratic organizations with clearly delineated hierarchies. Rules, roles, policies, and procedures were plainly outlined. This standardization and structure contributed to the ability of organizations to grow, develop, and succeed. Achievement in this hierarchical structure was dependent upon employees who obeyed the rules and practiced within established parameters. Over time, Veterans learned that they were rewarded if they obeyed the rules and worked hard. Consequently, Veterans today value loyalty, respect authority, and expect rewards for hard work (Hatfield, 2002). As they near retirement, they fully anticipate reaping the rewards of their loyalty, longevity, and contributions in…show more content…
Lack of conformity to the old rules became an established pattern. Everything from the justifiability of the Vietnam War to the limited role of women and people of color in society was debatable. Heroes were no longer men in positions of authority. Rather, those who questioned the status quo were the honored members of this generation. The experience of Watergate confirmed to Baby Boomers that people in positions of authority were not to be trusted. Long-standing societal rules and expectations were examined and altered, creating the assumption in the minds of Boomers that they should question authority and that the status quo could be transformed by working together (Lancaster & Stillman,
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