The Prisoner Of Azkaban Film Analysis

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Film Comparisons: Same cinematography, Matured Purposes As you can see, once the director’s general objectives have been put side by side, it becomes clear that there is a relationship. The most apparent connection would obviously be the books because the plot lines are continuous and intertwine. However, it seems that their influence may artistically be overlooked and is interesting to see how the same cinematic element can be used for opposing purposes. The Prisoner of Azkaban vs. The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 As mentioned before, the main link between the third and seventh film is the focus on environment. It seems that due to difference in maturity between the two films affected the objectives of the directors in a way that evolved the…show more content…
Both films are shot on location and the shots of the landscapes are impactful. They contrast with the rest of the films because there is an unprecedented naturalness that grounds the films and makes them feel like real places the audience could actually be a part of. As established before, Cuarón primary focus was to be explicit about the relationship between the characters and the environment, where he used the environment to reveal more of the world to audience. Many of the scenes, such as the Care of Magical Creatures class, the Hogsmeade excursion and the trio running through the school grounds feature the scenic landscape, which is then combined with prolonged shots of the scenery that set the time, place and mood of a scene. The use of a shot of the Weeping Willow and a shot of a flower wilting and blooming through the seasons also acts as a transition between plot points. (See Figure 3A, 3B) Respectively, Yates used the same technique in the seventh film. The use of a feather and the transitioning between locations that the characters were searching are prime examples of this, but what sets the seventh film a part is that it’s a Road…show more content…
This is where the reflection between the films becomes apparent. The cinematography in both films is very similar; however, Cuarón uses it to reveal the world whereas Yates uses it reveal the characters. Cuarón’s use of the environment nearly pieces the movie and characters together, but Yates’s utilization pulls it a part. Most of Cuaron’s shots of the environment are combined with a shot of the trio working together, such as when they are running through the lawn to save Buckbeak while Yate’s shots pull them a part, where we see many isolated shots that show how small they are or many shots where we first see an vast, empty landscape before they apparate in, which also emphasizes loneliness. Furthermore, the shot styles between the films are reflective of each other. The extreme close-ups, slow moving camera, and mis-en-scene are impactful in creating atmosphere. In the third film, the slow moving camera takes on a presence rather than a character, which embodies the omens that are essential to the films
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