Thesis On Gender In Education

783 Words4 Pages
For a long time, it is known that gender and education is a crucial global issue for society. This issue required studies and researches. Because of it, today there is a large amount of articles that discusses importance of gender in education. One of those types of articles is “Gender in Schools: A Qualitative Study of Students in Educational Administration” by Mary Lou Andrews and Carolyn S. Ridenour University of Dayton (2006). According to the article qualitative study is the main part of quantitative study. Although there is a weaknesses in the article such that stereotypes as an obstacle, analyzing shows that authors give meaningful arguments, examples, explanations, facts, and effective structure about blatant gender stereotypes and…show more content…
The article is based on authors’ study which contains observation of 122 graduate students during cultural diversity course. According to their research, public policy and academic need demand to broaden educational administration preparation program. People live in man-dominated society, and it affects women lifestyle in their academic life. As a case in point, women get high level education at school, and university, and despite the fact that the education level becomes better and better than past, today, there are still obstacles for women in job positions. Although they are well educated, they cannot work as a leader because of gender stereotypes. These problems forced authors to write the article in order to decrease effects of gender stereotypes for people, and help women overcome and break these types of…show more content…
The article consists of facts and research that clarify all sides of this stereotype clearly. The argument is about gender-stereotypic way to understand the subjects. The authors maintain that there are several stereotypes such as dividing subjects for genders. For instance, instructors believe that technical subjects are not for females, and males are not good at reading, or males are good at competitions than females such as spelling bee contest (2006: 41), and they do not evaluate their student’s talent. These types of stereotypes discourage students, and they become unhappy. As a result, students do not believe in themselves, and they think that if they do not do the work which is related to their gender, they will not be successful. It can lead to strengthened gender-segregated (SG) classes (Fabes, Pahlke, Martin and Hanish, 2003:
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