William B. Travis's Life During The Texas Revolution

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A man named William Barret Travis was a very important part during the Texas Revolution. William B. Travis was an American teacher, lawyer and soldier. He was the Texas commander at the Alamo and had one of the most well known documents in Texas history. Although he sadly passed at a young age, he still had a giant contribution during the Texas Revolution and had many accomplishments during his short life span. Travis was born in South Carolina on August 9, 1809. He spent his childhood in Saluda County, South Carolina. His parents names were Mark Travis and Jemima Stallworth. Growing up he was homeschooled, and he also worked on the family farm. He was the eldest of eleven children. When he was nine years old his family moved to a farm in Alabama. He attended the Red Bank Church. Also, he studied to become a lawyer and was teaching school. During his final years, he got married on October 26, 1828 to Rosanna Cato, one of the students he taught. He…show more content…
One is how he was the Texas commander at the Battle of the Alamo, but he sadly passed during this war at the age of twenty six. Historians know of eight letters that Alamo commander William Barret Travis sent out while the Alamo was under siege. The Alamo siege began on February 23, 1836, and continued for almost two weeks. Travis’s appeal from the Alamo for reinforcements has become an American symbol of unyielding courage and heroism. Although a few reinforcements arrived before the Alamo fell, Travis and over 180 defenders gave their lives for Texas independence on March 6, 1836. These are facts about William Travis’ early life, later life, and accomplishments. He is most known for being a Texas leader and his contributions during the Texas Revolution. He is one of the most courageous men in Texas history. Born in South Carolina on 9 August 1809, William Barret Travis will always be remembered as the Texas commander at the Battle of the

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