Cochlear Implants In Deaf Culture

642 Words3 Pages
Fitting into society can be hard for any person, but it can be even more difficult for a deaf person. With a cochlear implant, it can give the person more of an ability to fit into society. Everyone wants to fit in and get along with people. If the person cannot hear, then most kids will look at them differently and not include him or her. The children could be scared of the child that cannot hear and does not always know what is going on, or how to communicate with a normal hearing person. Not only do children get scared, adults also get scared and do not always know how to act around people who are deaf and do not know how to communicate. Getting a cochlear implant will enhance the child’s capability to fit in better with other children,…show more content…
This case study suggests when the child gains their self-confidence, the other children are more likely to accept them. Therefore, if the patient is comfortable with the implant and is not self-conscious about it, then the other children will not be as bothered by it. The deaf culture is a set of social beliefs, values, history, behaviors, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness. The main use of communication for the deaf is American Sign Language. The deaf culture is against cochlear implants because they believe that if every deaf person gets a cochlear implant then their culture as a whole will be gone. Sparrow explains, “According to the testimony of many individuals who are members of Deaf culture, it is perfectly possible to lead a happy and productive life without hearing or spoken language” (137). The deaf culture believes that deaf people do not need cochlear implants to fit into society. They believe that deafness is not a disease and does not need to be fixed. With a cochlear implant, it is not used to fix the deafness, it is used to help with the person to give them more of a normal life and to help them have the ability to fit into society…show more content…
The cost of a cochlear implant is around $100,000. When people look at the cost it might automatically turn them away, but most insurance companies or Medicare will pay for it. The person would first have to meet their deductible before the insurance company will pay for the rest, but whatever the cost is, is definitely worth the expenditure. Nussbaum re emphasizes, “The coverage and payment have greatly improved in recent years as use of this device is becoming more commonplace, especially for young children” (39). Depending on what the person can afford will also depend on what type of cochlear implant that they will be able to get. According to a study conducted at Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, and Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust researchers found, “Previous economic evaluations indicate that [unilateral cochlear implants] are likely to be cost-effective” (Bond et al. 87). The unilateral cochlear implant is more cost-effective than the bilateral cochlear implant. The unilateral implant may not be as effective as the bilateral implant, but if money 's an issue the unilateral implant is the way to go. The cost is usually not an issue when it comes to getting a cochlear implant, so the cost should not be a reason not to get a cochlear
Open Document