Economic Growth In Agriculture

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Growth in agriculture is therefore not only associated with an increase in farm incomes, it also stimulates linkages with the non-farm economy, causing economic growth and rapid poverty reduction (Osei-Akoto et al., 2013). Otherwise, in countries where agriculture has failed or lagged behind other sectors, hunger is definitely inescapable. Incidentally, this has been the bane of most African countries economies as poor health reduces farmer’s ability to innovate, experiment, and operationalize changes in agricultural systems (Asenso-Okyere et al., 2010). Serious health conditions result in catastrophic expenditures which may also end in depletion of productive assets such as sale of draught animals and sale of cultivable land (Slater and Wiggins,…show more content…
In Sub–Saharan Africa for example, agriculture employs over 65% of the total labour force and generates about 32% of growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (World Bank, 2007). Impaired human health and nutrition lowers both agricultural outcome and human capital accumulation by adding vulnerability to disease which then leads to decline in agricultural output (WHO, 2010b). Improving farming households’ nutrition and health is an end in itself thereby making it a fundamental goal of economic development. The problem posed by poverty and low agricultural output of farmers in Sub-Saharan countries in spite of their generous natural resource endowments has consistently continue to baffle agricultural policy…show more content…
(2010) observed that in the extreme event of mortality of a sick adult, considerable agricultural knowledge acquired through learning and experience would lost. Due to conceptual and methodological reasons, the empirical evidence available so far households food utilization, nutrition and health of farming households, has been less obvious or at best contradictory. Even though on the broader level, there is evidence of an association between measures of household economic status and variety of nutrition and health outcomes, the empirical literature on the topic has been so scarce and much less confirmative giving room for normative verdict on nutrition- health of farming households, these verdict however strongly remain generally accepted. The need for broader studies to provide this empirical evidence is imperative for an informing policy intervention in agriculture. Agricultural research could have more impact on nutrition and health outcomes by prioritizing research questions about nutritious food access (e.g. cost reduction), diet quality, and food safety, and generally that impact should be measured by appropriate indicator (CGIAR, 2013). This study aim
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