Essay On Caribbean Fashion

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African aesthetic plays an intricate role in Caribbean fashion. It combines various colors, patterns, and fabrics which the Caribbean is known for. As a result, over the years Caribbean fashion relies heavily on African influences. Such influences are attributed by slavery, creolization and conformity. In the 17th century the first dress was the uniform of the estate afforded to those working and resident on plantation farms. Drab in appearance, three yards of either brown, grey or blue were worn as a wrap-around becoming a tunic with three holes catered for the head and arms. As a belt, a length of rope was tied around. To protect them from the harsh sun that ferociously beat down and for comfort, plantation slaves wore wide brimmed straw hats and a head scarf while the house slaves tied a piece of cloth around their heads. Over time inspired by their combined traditions, dress evolved into saris and…show more content…
The development of Afro-centric fabric aesthetics in the Caribbean started from such materials like the Madras Cloth. The Madras cloth is a large silk or cotton kerchief usually of bright colors that is often worn as a turban. The fabric takes it name from the former name of the city of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. In other words, the cloth was identified by the it 's colloquial name, "Madrasi Checks". The Africans adopted the Madras cloth from the Indians because it reminded them of their Kente Cloth. The Kente is one of the most famous cloths from Africa. It is a type of silk and cotton fabric made of interwoven cloth strips and is native to the Akan ethnic group of South Ghana. Such a material is used to make clothes like Dashikis, dresses. The Africans adored this cloth because it reminded them so much of home. Not home being a physical place but the ideas, memories, stories of where they were from. This cloth was then used to make items such as dresses, skirts, pants and tie heads. The significance of this cloth was very essential in the newly free
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