Pros And Cons Of The Patriot Act

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The Patriot Act (the full name is the USA Patriot Act, or "Uniting and Strengthening America Act by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001") was signed on October 26 by the former U.S. President George W. Bush in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11. The main purposes are to improve the level of domestic security and to strengthen the powers of law-enforcement agencies in terms of identifying and eliminating terrorists. The US government and its supporters believe that it is one of the most useful tools to investigate and arrest terrorists within and outside the borders of the country. However, critics argue about Acts “overpower” which treats the civilians in non-democratic way and…show more content…
But Why? The reason is that other articles are controversial and usually are widely criticized.
The first thing, which should be mentioned, is obviously how the Patriot Act passed so quickly. It was shorter than 48 hours between the presentation of the bill and its passing in both houses of Congress. Critics are still arguing that such “powerful” Bill had to be debated and deliberated.
Secondly, it is also considered that Patriot Act violates the constitutional civil liberties of the United States, especially: right to privacy, freedom from unreasonable searches, conducting wiretaps, using NSLs, search the private property without any notification and detain a material witness or a suspect with no access to lawyer. There are many evidences when the law was used inappropriate towards non-terrorist criminals. New York Times writes: “The Bush administration, which calls the USA Patriot Act perhaps its most essential tool in fighting terrorists, has begun using the law with increasing frequency in many criminal investigations that have little or no connection to terrorism.” This article shows that the government started to use “new” authority under the Patriot Act to investigate cases on drug trafficking, money laundries, blackmailers and child pornography. Justice Department arguments their position
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In many of these cases, the agents, without any authorization, forced the internet providers and communication companies to give the information. Moreover, FBI agents could use the Patriot Act “guise” for their own
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