The Comanche Indians

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The Comanche were never really a Indian or Tribal Nation, but they had great success in their early years working as groups or bands. But because a lack of a true unity for them in the beginning, despite their success, it became one of their greatest weaknesses. During the Spaniards occupation in the West and Southwest of America in the early eightieth century, the horse was introduced to America and to the American Indians. Groups or Band of Shoshoni Indians broke away and moved into the plains of the United States, Colorado, Kansas, Texas giving them greater access to wild mustangs and other large herds of animals like the buffalo1. They became expert horseman with the skills to hunt conduct warfare and they lived in a nomadic life which allowed them to follow the migrating herds…show more content…
It was not until 1836 when Texas won its Independence and later in 1845 when Texas was annexed into the United States that saw the downturn for the Comanches 3. As more and more white settlers moved into the plains area this impacted the hunting areas for many of the Comanche bands. Many took to raiding the settlements and this lead to greater force to be used against them. Since they where not all united they were divided and forced onto reservation lands. Those who did not move to reservations where wiped out. Some Comanche bands, like the Penateka whose band was weaken from continuous fighting with the Texan and the depletion of the buffalo herds in 1854 willingly moved onto a reservation. In 1867 saw the last treaty made with the Comanche under the Treaty of the Medicine Lodge Creek which established a reservation for the Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache Kiowa was made. Once the Comanche where forced onto the reservation their population was very low only about 1,600 forcing them to restructure Comanche lifestyle

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