The Importance Of Working In Groups

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Working in groups are used as means for learning at all levels in most educational systems, from compulsory education to higher education. There was a strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups (Chiriac, 2015). “More hands make for lighter work.” “Two heads are better than one.” “The more the merrier.” These prominent phrases speak to the potential groups have to be more productive, creative, and motivated than individuals on their own. As for a student, there are countless benefits to be gained in working as a group. Group projects can help students develop a host of skills that are increasingly important in the professional world. Positive group experiences, moreover, have been shown to contribute…show more content…
But without careful planning and facilitation, group work can frustrate students and instructors and feel like a waste of time (SD, 1999). It was said that participation among group members has been linked to an increase in learning and satisfaction (Zhu, 2012), they involve total participation of the group as a whole, greater equality of participation among the group members, and the amount of participation that occurs each time a group member speaks, all of which have been shown to affect the learning process (Core, Moore & Zinn, 2003; Webb, 1995; Warschauer, 1995; Zhu,…show more content…
Some groups lack motivation, strong leadership, or simply have personality conflicts. Even when it appears that a group was falling apart, it is important to avoid breaking up the group. Not only will the group dynamics of the original group be affected if the members are reassigned, but the addition of members to other groups will disrupt their dynamics as well (Davis, 1993). Many people cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in group. This phenomenon is called “grouphate.” Grouphate has been referred to as the dread and repulsion that many people feel about working in groups or teams (Sorension, 1981). This event may cause interruption on the groups’ harmony and progress. Other than this, “the Ringleman effect,” or social loafing was another hindrance to a groups, it is the tendency for individual productivity to increase as group size increases. One way to help prevent conflict and group members who shirk duties is to keep the group small. It is difficult to be the “loafer” or a “slacker” in a small group (Davis, 1993). Additionally, matching the work assignment to skill sets will help separate the “loafers” from the students who are generally struggling (Freeman & Greenacre, 2011). Freeman and Greenacre (2011) suggest that instructors should help the students understand the benefits of working together as a group for the group as a whole, which will help students who are struggling (Greenacre,
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