To What Extent Was The American Revolution Dbq

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The American Revolution did not arise instantly. There were many factors that laid the foundation of the revolution, one being high taxation. In approach to the revolution the colonists developed a sense of identity and unity as Americans. Anger and frustration pointed towards the British built up and eventually exploded into a war. By the eve of the revolution many, but not all colonists set their differences aside to achieve one goal, to overcome the tyrannical British become truly independent. Even though the colonists originated from England, many viewed themselves as Americans not English. To be successful in overcoming the British, Benjamin Franklin knew that the colonists had to unite. In Document A he constructed a political cartoon that…show more content…
In document D Byles states,” They call me a brainless Tory; but tell me, my young friend, which is better, to be ruled by one tyrant three thousand miles away, or by three thousand tyrants not a mile away” This shows that some colonists still considered themselves as English, and were against independence. Document F also supports this claim,” We [saw] a Set of men… under the Auspices of the english Government; & protected by it… but we [saw] them also run mad with too much Happiness & burst into an open rebellion…” As you can see many colonists called for rebellion but unity was never one hundred percent throughout the colonies, some were patriots while others remained loyal to the crown. Many revolutions are caused to a buildup of mistrust, exploitation and an unjust government, the American Revolution was an example of this. Once the revolution began there was no stopping it. Document E states, “the arms we have been compelled by our enemies to assume, we will… being with one mind resolved to die freemen, rather than live [like] slaves.” The American colonists were determined to overcome oppressive British or die in the
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