Politics In Nigeria Pest Analysis

831 Words4 Pages
2.1 Independence - Politics In 1959, there was already clear indication about the forthcoming independence. The country therefore held an election in order to choose a leader. However, no party achieved a majority. It resulted in a combined government suitable for its citizens formed by The National Popula-tion Commission of Nigeria combined with the National Council of Nigeria and the Came-roons Abubakar Tafawa Balewa (NPC) was elected as prime minister and Azikiwe (NCNC) as governor-general. The first few couple of years of Nigeria's independence were filled with conflict between the Nigerian regions. In 1962, the western region had a part of the Action Group, another political party, split off under S. I. Akintola to form the Nigerian…show more content…
Afterwards, the Nigerian society was ready to effetely take on the challenge of building the “new Nigeria” with a self-sustaining Nigerian economy comprising agricultural, industrial, and service sectors. After gaining independence, the Nigerian state focused on economic growth and development. The First official National Development Plan, (1962-1968), was developed with the objective of leading the Nigerian economy on a fast growth path. The Plan ensured that the State partici-pated in economic activities, both directly and indirectly. The plan stated that the Govern-ment should provide the necessary infrastructure as well as provide investable funds in order to accelerate the rate of economic development in order to fight the spiteful circle of…show more content…
The different policies of the oil boom era "failed" to address these recognized/identified features of the economy. The increase in the money flow affected the income distribution level and the gap between the rich and the poor, began to emerge. Different classes consisting of traders, commission agents and contractors started to appear. Non-Nigerians controlled the manufacturing, trading and services sub-sectors. Most of the big companies (especially in the oil sector) were branches of multi nationals with little no local Nigerian involvement in the high levels of management. This continued until the mid-1960-s when some Nigerians began to occupy sen-ior positions in a few of the multinational
Open Document