Should College Students Get Paid After College

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The total cost of an in-state university (including room, board, books, travel, and miscellaneous expenses) hit $24,061, up $651 or 2.8% from last year. This to most isn’t just pocket change, having this kind of money annually for 4 or more years isn’t easy, most students get grants, scholarships, or loans to pay for the extensive tuition. So is college really worth the student loans/debt, tuition cost, and possible monetary wages and payoff? Preliminarily, students apply for loans when they don’t have the money to pay for their books or other expenses that derive from college. Loans can quickly turn into a substantial amount of debt by the time a student completes their standard 4 year degree. As a result, this debt can carry on throughout their adult life and make starting that life more difficult. “A record share of students are leaving college with a…show more content…
Does one make enough to pay back the loans? Does one have enough to buy a house? Does one have enough for a car payment? Does one have enough for a furniture payment? Does one even have enough to pay standard bills? The cost doesn’t stop there, so were those thousands of dollars spent really worth it? That’s what most ask themselves at night when they can’t sleep because they’re figuring out how to pay their light bill. The ground on wages fluctuates by year, “hourly wages for young college-educated men in 2000 were $22.75, but that dropped by almost a full dollar to $21.77 by 2010. For young college-educated women, hourly wages fell from $19.38 to $18.43 over the same period” (“New College Grads Losing Ground on Wages.”). This means that the wages people are obtaining after college is dropping and that “it will be likely be many years before young college graduates-or any workers- see substantial wage growth.” Does that sound like a suitable amount of money considering the expenses, sweat, and more than likely the tears expelled in
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